playing around in pop art

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As part of our fine arts focus break this week we learned about Romero Britto and his engaging, bright pop art. Students were excited to try to replicate the happy, positive images and colors. Britto combines elements of cubism, fauvism, pop art, and graffiti in his paintings, using his bright and vibrant palette to portray lighthearted subject matter, creating a visual expression of hope and happiness (source).  We chose a whale as a topic so no one felt stuck on what to draw, but anyone who really wanted to choose something else was encouraged to tackle pop art their way.

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2019 poetry graffiti wall

img_3371I love Poetry Month, and because this was my first year at a new campus I was able to introduce the idea of the poetry wall using graffiti-style acrostic poems to new students. We don’t have the large scale space at this campus to hang up as much as I’d like to, but we made the wall work with some creative input from 5th graders. See my previous poetry posts to show how much I LOVE celebrating poetry every April. The topics are mostly names, and the planning was similar to traditional acrostic poetry, the twist is making the graffiti style display with the work.

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pizza and pigs, a signing and creative book extension

img_3023I was lucky to collaborate with a friend in theater and a friend who uses ASL fluently to plan a book sharing experience for kinder and second-grade students recently. I wanted to share the clever little book Pizza Pig because, well, do you have to have a reason to read about either pizza or pigs? Not in my book.

Before reading we brainstormed our favorite places to go out to dinner, and what we liked best to have there. We also covered some basic ASL signs we could repeat throughout the book; pizza, pig, eat, hungry, and some various animals. Please and thank you are always good signs to use when eating out, too. As we read the book, we stopped to discuss what a bear might really want to eat other than pizza, and if he could order pizza topped with those things at this restaurant.

img_3028.jpgAfter we read we had two closing activities students really enjoyed; creating a pizza that showed either their favorite toppings or the toppings they thought would be best for a favorite animal. My son decided to create a pizza slice for a blue whale (the animal he recently read about in the library). He topped it with squid and plankton. Students also paired up to act out taking a pizza order over the phone. Partner A had to guess what kind of animal might be calling to order the pizza based on Partner B’s list of toppings! Great speaking, listening and writing all from one little book.

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